Tag Archives: bookshop

Robin Hobb, Art and Horror.

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510-znU+BAL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_I haven’t been here for a while. Thought it was time, especially since I’ve been buying a good deal of excellent books. Working part-time at Waterstones means I have an amazing opportunity to gather as many books as I can carry and bring them into my house and shut the door. Books are more important to me than buying clothes, except I do insist on good quality pyjamas!  So I am going to catch up, show you all the books I’ve been buying and reading, including ones I had to buy for research for my novel! (Cough.) I must talk about Robin Hobb. Some of you may know her already. She’s brilliant!

5141EMwHyfL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_A lovely lady in my book shop persuaded me to read The Liveship Traders last year. Fantastic rare ships made of sentient wizard wood and the figureheads come alive and speak. (Ooh why didn’t I think of that.) Now that I know the stories better, I would recommend reading The Farseer Trilogy first. Assassin’s Apprentice, Royal Assassin and Assassin’s Quest. The protagonist is Fitz Farseer. I love him! Robin Hobb’s characters are incredible. Her writing ability and her imagination is impressive. I often wonder how she can keep up the momentum of remembering all of her story plots. I bet she gets through a lot of note books! Follow Fitz in the first series as he grows up and  trained as the King’s assassin. Magnificent! The book covers are beautifully illustrated by the talented Jackie Morris.

9783836538350Next. Hieronymus Bosch, published by Taschen. Oh I love this. His work is so incredible and Taschen always prints a very beautiful book. I am inspired when I look at his paintings. If you take a very close look you see not only spiritual and fantastical creatures but some images are truly bizarre and nightmarish. I think Jung and Freud would have liked this. You could have a field day in psychology over these.  No record has been found of the painter and what he believed in or what kind of person he was but apparently his work has been accepted to teach moral and spiritual truth. They are pretty out there for its time. They must have been shocking and he must have been a very interesting man. He’s a mystery. Lovely.

51Xv9C7RvqL._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_ I recently wanted to buy a good Manga book. I really like Manga but I don’t buy it often. I wanted something dark. I got it. Uzumaki, by Junji Ito. A horror story. I read the back. Kurouzu-cho,  a small fogbound town on the coast of Japan is Cursed. I looked inside. Spiral’s everywhere. Frightened and terrified sad faces. Monster’s. People dying horribly. Yes that’ll do. Bought. The drawings are magnificent and a big reason  I chose it. The art is incredibly detailed and this deluxe edition has been printed really well with lovely paper! If you fancy a special piece of Manga horror, then this is one to have. I’m really pleased with it. Thank you very much. On the shelf.

More books coming soon.

 

 

My Interview with James Daunt Of Waterstones.

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James Daunt 03/10/13As a bookseller and a writer, I love the publishing world. What more could you want then being surrounded by shelves of  the most amazing  stories and creative talents pulled from very interesting minds and peoples experiences. After performing on stage for years, I’ve slowed down to combine my creative nature with the story telling world. I  can now sit at home and have the cat on my lap and a coffee beside me while working on my own. To me that is absolute heaven.

In the last few months, I’ve been taking a full time Professional Writing MA at Falmouth University, ( I’ve just passed!) and whilst working in Waterstones part-time,  I managed to interview James Daunt, Managing director for my Industry module.

I really wanted to talk about the survival of the book industry, maybe a question he’d been asked numerous times, but because I feel strongly about the physical book and so do many customers, I knew it wasn’t a question he would be bored with. I wanted to speak to the man himself and confirm what I’d been witnessing in the shop.

Me: ‘How have you managed to keep the bookshop on the High Street against the ever-growing market of the e-book?’

JD: The e-book has it’s natural place. It can be appropriate for travel, for saving space in the home, the green point of view and the digital book is cheaper, making it a finance choice for the customer. Amazon is all about pushing the digital book because they are interested in what they can sell beyond that. But publisher’s recently took a stand against the price of Amazon’s digital’s prices and took their books off the Amazon site and renegotiated, led by Hachette, Macmillan and Harper Collins, to conclude that the publisher sets the price of the digital book. This allows publishers to keep the price to a level that doesn’t distort the market in favour of digital. This is a huge significant development because Hachette had for almost six months been locked in a bitter dispute. This means the publisher has gained back some control with their sales with the physical book. Amazon still have a monopoly on many books with publishers, and we all know about the corporate tax that they avoid by registering in the EU and avoids paying the tax it should in the UK. Waterstones and other business’s have to pay a high level of rates that online businesses don’t, and it has affected many businesses not just Waterstones.

Me: What about the physical book? Are people still buying enough physical books to keep the shop and other book shops open and why would they come in to Waterstones if you could buy cheaper elsewhere?

JD: You have to make Waterstones an interesting and attractive shop. So you make people come into them more, buy books and come back. If you sell better books your customers read them quicker and come back for more. An old system that’s been changed in the way the shop looks, is that the Publishers use to pay a premium for their chosen books and Waterstones would put them in the shops exactly how the publishers dictated, Waterstones sold slots and campaigns were created. This meant the shops all looked the same. We made a huge decision to change this, it took away an incredible amount of income for Waterstones but it meant they have the decision on what’s going to sell, displayed and what gets chosen for The Book club and The Book of the Month.

I also think this gives a greater chance to other authors who might not have been otherwise selected as the chosen title with the publishers.

Waterstones has the choice of what books to campaign, and now they are selling better books, the shops are individualised to suit the market area they are in, and the bookseller is ‘handselling’ the books Waterstones decides on. It’s organic.

I asked if the publisher missed that level of control, if they were unhappy about it. But he said that because the books Waterstones are choosing are selling well, and the publishers aren’t paying Waterstones for the marketing, it’s working out for both sides. Of course, my experience of being an independent bookseller, I know that making a shop welcoming works.

I enjoyed listening to someone who obviously enjoyed not only his job but the product he sells. (Yes he earns more than me!) But I have found the human nature of the need for a physical book fascinating.

I don’t believe the book will disappear. I think they are so much part of our DNA and culture that they will always exist and there will always be a need, an appetite for them. Most of the customers I speak with are book fanatics: to hold a book is a kinaesthetic experience, and you find people buy them even if they don’t have the time to read. (Or is that just me?) This is what brings people back, encourage them to come and see and pick books that have been carefully selected and chosen for every genre on the market.

I asked James Daunt what Books he loves to read.

JD: The classics are still excellent and continue to stand the test of time, but I read quite a lot of the new literature so that I can talk to the customers about those books in the shops.

Change and evolving with the market seems to be the focus and that the bookseller is the key to saving the physical book. I’m just very glad that the book is still here. (I’m going to buy some more now!)

Dark, Urban, Supernatural Fantasy Urges.

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About seven years ago I embraced reading like  I was a woman obsessed. At the time, life was testing me. My career had changed direction, and I had a baby and a teenage son. I was single and at home…a lot.

The ‘catch up on the classics’ lightning bolt hit me. Why? I have no idea, just this deep urge to read the books that I had somehow avoided in my wild teenage days.

So Jane Austin’s library was devoured, Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White, Thomas Hardy, Far from the Maddening Crowd, Tess. Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, and so on. My favourite? Dorian Grey. Yes, horror, the supernatural.  I remembered,  as a child I wrote horror stories. A deep sense of grounding overcame me, I needed more. More!

One night, as I watched TV, baby in bed, teenage son in his room ( where he now resided full time and survived on food passed through a gap in the door ) a programme came on. True Blood. Memorised, I fell in love. I went straight to the bookshop the next day, bought all of Charlaine Harris, the Sookie Stackhouse, True Blood novels and ate them up. That led to ‘others’. I remember the staff in the bookshop avoided eye contact, a slight distaste on their lips when I bought more and more Dark fantasy. I got the feeling they wanted to put them in brown paper bags and slide them across the counter. But I didn’t care! Ha ha ha ha ha.

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Reading Dark and Urban Fantasy books did more than entertain me, I became happy. I rediscovered a subject I loved. It wasn’t the sex, vampires that lured me, ( only sometimes )  but the stories of the supernatural. The story telling. Folklore, forests, woods, witches and myths. Over time I knew I had to start writing again, I was thirteen when I last wrote like a mad thing, when my new english teacher told me I was rubbish! Don’t ever listen to Mr Sandercock, he’s not up to much!

Well, I’ve learnt something, that it doesn’t matter, it’s all debatable, always someone who isn’t going to like it. So who cares right? The only person that really cares is me and I love it!

It’s never too late to read, to have books in your life. You just have to find a foundation of genre you love. I now read Non-fiction , Science, Bestiaries. YA, anything that interests and inspires me.

But…I will always, deeply be in love with my dark side.

 

More books what I bought…

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Nobrow, Graphic Novel.

 The lovely book itself is a light-hearted and playful exploration of possible theories of the creation of the universe dreamt up by the contributors themselves. The quality of the paper and the binding is truly lovely. If you are a fan of illustration or even books in general, this is a lovely book to have in the library. You can see some examples of the content on the Nobrow website. I have yet to read this, so watch out for the review. It is amazing in the flesh!

“Faery Tales” by carol Ann Duffy

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A stunning gift edition. I bought this mainly for the cover

Faraway lands of wicked witches, evil monsters. Carol Ann Duffy’s stunning collection of fairy tales.

Once upon a time . . . I bought the same book twice!

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Penguins deluxe edition of Emily Bronte’s “Wuthering Heights”.

The problem I have working in a book shop is I see all the new editions and new releases and have to own them. Yes, I already have “Wuthering heights”, but look at that cover!

I shall be back with more delights. I’m just piling them up, until I pounce and devour them all.

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